Posts Tagged With: consequences

The Generational Divide

Over the past few months, I’ve been having some conversations with various people about an Adirondack Park Agency regulation that caught me by surprise when I heard about it.  What is it? It’s that all new wilderness camping sites must be at least 150 feet from a water front or trail, and any existing site must be relocated to that distance if it requires  reconstruction.  Considering that my job does mean keeping up with regulations, it was the first I’d heard of it, hence part of my shock.  The other part was being incredulous that it was thought to be a good idea.

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Categories: Adirondacks, Environment | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Go Digital Or Go Dark

One of the fond memories I have about my childhood in the Adirondacks was when my parents would decide to take us to a movie at a small theater in a nearby town.  It also served as a performance venue for various bands, stage shows, and the community theater.  It was always a special treat to go, and to this day, I still love to go to a movie, buy a bucket of popcorn, and watch a movie in the theater.  When I moved back here, the theater was still going, until 2006, when the owner decided to close it.  After two years of effort and organization, it was taken over by a community group and reopened, to everyone’s delight.  But recently, another threat loomed on the horizon, and it wasn’t just this theater that is facing it.

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Categories: Adirondacks, Media, Technology | Tags: , , | 4 Comments

Some Science Stuff

One of the things that has caused me to lose serious respect for many environmental action groups is their hysteria over genetically modified organisms.   Their attacks rely on a lot of junk science, and some other things:

Well, it owes to a mishmash of anti-corporatist ideology, natural fallacy (GMOs are not natural!) and precautionary principle extremism. But here’s the odd thing. If you read through the reader responses to the NRO article, you’ll see lots of GMO-fearing conservatives who also hate Monsanto.

Over the years I’ve seen more crap about this than anything else.   It doesn’t help at all, and particularly when you have well-known people pushing it through sloppy, plagiarized books and using their reputations as an appeal to authority.  It needs to change.

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Categories: Environment, science | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

What Part of No Didn’t You Understand?

There’s a story in the news about Google pushing its “Google Plus” social networking, to get more sites to allow people to log in using their Google identities.  Just a nice feature?  No, not really.  It’s for advertising and revenue purposes.  It’s nothing new, Facebook already does it:

Since 2008, Facebook has been able to gather massive troves of information about its users’ activities even if they are not on Facebook because many popular apps – such as Spotify’s music streaming service – allow users to log in with their Facebook identity, which results in data funneled back to the social network.

Google already owns YouTube, and has been pushing people to sign up (or as they call it, “upgrading”) for Google Plus in order to comment or log in.

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Categories: Technology | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

The Environmental Slumlords

Recently, there was an opinion piece about how a certain area of state land should be classified. The author, who works for an environmental advocacy group, was arguing for the strictest classification, and then went on to discuss how to limit access as well as what facilities should be constructed and where. My reply comment was “Great, and just who do you think is going to do this?” This isn’t the only time something like this has happened. I had a similar response to another group a few years ago that was trying to advocate for the creation of a new national park. Why would I make these responses? Because I’m for parks.

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Categories: Adirondacks, Environment | Tags: , , , , , | 4 Comments

The PC – Not Dead Yet

In looking around at the various tech and business sites or blogs, there’s discussion about how the personal computer seems to be “on the way out.”  They’re basing that on sales figures from various manufacturers, as well as the sales of Microsoft’s new operating system, Windows 8.   The thinking is that “obviously” the market has shifted, and people are purchasing tablets and smartphones as replacements for their personal computers.

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Snow Day Musing

The latest winter storm, or as The Weather Channel calls it, winter storm “Nemo,” is moving off.    While we were under a winter storm warning, the actual brunt of it was off to the southeast of us.    Around here, we weren’t all that concerned, it’s stuff we’re used to handling.  A few years ago, we had a lot of snow fall, and while we’ve had more than last year – which was a very mild winter – we’re still not even in the ballpark of “heavy snows.”

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Categories: Adirondacks, science | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Isn’t Anything “For Granted” About It

One of the interesting – or annoying – things about living in the Adirondacks is that you get a perspective on how many things have become “taken for granted,” when in reality, there’s nothing “granted” about it.   In fact, just two or three decades ago, they didn’t exist or were only available to a limited few.   I realized this the morning when my internet connection started having problems because of the weather.  It was annoying, to put it mildly.  You see, I take it “for granted” that my connection will be working, and will have a reasonably high speed.  But less than a decade ago (7 years, to be precise), my internet connection here would have been a dial-up, and that would have been “iffy.”  But it was what was available.  A decade before that?  I would have been (and did) paying for that same connection “by the minute,”  and if I’d lived here, I wouldn’t have had it at all.

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Categories: Adirondacks, Technology | Tags: , | 2 Comments

What were you thinking?

I’ve been reading through some recent news stories, and it made me wonder what the hell these people were thinking (or if they did) when they chose their careers.  The first was in a story about hospitals cracking down on workers who don’t get the flu shots.

Cancer nurse Joyce Gingerich is among the skeptics and says her decision to avoid the shot is mostly “a personal thing.” She’s among seven employees at IU Health Goshen Hospital in northern Indiana who were recently fired for refusing flu shots. Gingerich said she gets other vaccinations but thinks it should be a choice. She opposes “the injustice of being forced to put something in my body.”

Riiiight.

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Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , | 3 Comments

Technology Qualms

Early last year, I left a site I’d been a member of for almost 6 years – Digg. Why? Well, because they changed their user system. Instead of having a Digg account, you had to use your Facebook account to log in. They’ve since changed this to allow you to use your Twitter or Google Plus accounts as well. The problem? Quite simply, I don’t have a Facebook or Google Plus account, and have absolutely no plans to get one. I do have a Twitter account, so I could return, but that first announcement was the “last straw.” But it points out something that’s becoming an increasing problem: The assumption that everyone has a Facebook account.

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Categories: Technology | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

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